Tag Archives: Jeep

World’s Best Car Ads

It’s official!

The non-profit group, The One Club named the global winners January 13, 2015 during a special even during the press days of the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. There were submissions  from 16 countries, but only two winning USA advertisers and ad agencies: Audi of America and its shop Venables Bell & Partners in San Francisco, along with Hyundai Motor America and Innocean USA in Huntington Beach, Calif.

Audi and Hyundai won the Broadcast TV category in a 3-way tie with Toyota Australia.

Audi’s winning TV spot for the all-new Q3, dubbed “The Scripted Life,” encourages people to “break from the script” of mundane, everyday  life.

The commercial wasn’t widely watched on YouTube, generating a mere 20,000 views from the time it was posted in late August to mid-January. In my book, it’s just an okay commercial.

Hyundai’s award winner was from the 2014 Super Bowl commercial. The spot for the Genesis touts the car’s sensory surround safety. Dubbed “Dad’s Sixth Sense,” the spot shows how the automatic emergency braking works to help a teen son at the wheel with his father riding shotgun avoiding a crash with another car as he checks out a young lady on the sidewalk.

My absolute favorite of the winning broadcast trio is Toyota Australia’s “Unbreakable Drivers,” for the Toyota Hilux pickup from Saatchi & Saatchi in Sydney. The humor is pure Aussie fun and can’t help but make you smile.

The spot, featuring narration by Down Under actor Russel Crowe, attracted a respectable nearly 590,000 views in just over 3 months.

Volvo Trucks won the Online Video category. Ad agency Forsman & Bodenfors in Gothenburg, Sweden, created this dramatic “Epic Split” video to demonstrate the precision and directional stability of Volvo Dynamic Steering. Actor Jean-Claude Van Damme is absolutely amazing doing a split as the two Volvo Trucks back up

Even more amazing: Forsman & Bodenfors and director Andreas Nilsson shot the 1:16 video in one take (in Spain on a closed landing field at sunrise). The haunting music is Enya’s “Only Time.”

But the real eye popper is that this video attracted more than 77 million views on YouTube since it was posted just two months ago!

Honda took home the Interactive award with a 2:55 video from Wieden + Kennedy, London, for the Civic Type R.

Dubbed “The Other Side,” W+K produced two parallel tales of the same man, a caring dad by day picking up his daughters in his white Civic and by night an undercover cop delivering a crew of art thieves to a police sting driving a red, sportier Type R.

The viewer is in control, merely having to press the “R” key to toggle between actor Jean-Phillipe Ricci’s two lives.

The original video on YouTube hit 4 million views in less than 3 months and was boosted by the web site www.hondatheotherside.com along with social media. Daniel Wolfe directed, with Bobby Krlic of The Haxan Cloak handling the music.

Volkswagen was awarded top honors in Experiential Advertising for an in-theater, car safety push from Ogilvy One Beijing in China. Movie goers may have thought they were watching a pre-film car commercial of someone driving along a road, but got a shock when their mobile phones sounded

VW says the effort to curb mobile use while driving attracted a lot of media coverage, was the top auto viral video and generated more than 26 million views in a month.

It’s not the first time VW has used a jarring shock to get the safety message out. Back in 2006, VW of America ran a commercial that showed a Jetta with two young couples coming home from a double date at the movies getting suddenly rammed by another driver. No one was hurt, but the spot from Crispin Porter + Bogusky in Miami was both praised and panned.

Jeep won the Print/Outdoor award for work by Leo Burnett France in Paris. The “Upside Down” poster campaign. In a unique move, the ads do NOT show a Jeep. Instead, each poster shows a different animal. But when the image is flipped 180 degrees there is a different animal. “See whatever you want to see” is the ad tag.

JeepAdElephantPosterJeepAdSwanPoster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Kudos to all the the winners of the 2nd Annual One Show Automobile Advertising of the Year Awards!

MAKING TRACKS: Satish Korde moves up to Chief Operating Officer at WPP Group’s Global Team Ford in Dearborn, Michigan from CEO of sibling Team Detroit, a post he’s held since the summer of 2011.

SatishKordeBefore his 2011 appointment, the low-profile Korde had been global client director for Team Detroit’s parent company, WPP.

Korde succeeds Mark LaNeve, 55, who will move Feb. 1 to his client, Ford Motor Co., as head of U.S. sales, marketing and service.

MarkLaNeve

BIG IDEA FROM HYUNDAI’S MOTHER SHIP

South Korea- based Hyundai has been on a roll in the past several years, with much-improved products that have boosted sales and lifted the brand’s image around the world.

Why mess with success, right?

Not exactly.

The marketing “gurus” at the Mother Ship in Seoul decided it was time for Hyundai’s first worldwide ad campaign to build a consistent global message for the brand. Or maybe they felt it was time to flex their authoritative muscles or justify their positions.

What did they come up with?  A new brand campaign themed  “Live Brilliant.”

Really?

Take a look at this lame attempt to stir emotions, just one of four :60 television commercials in the series

How does this differentiate Hyundai from others? Not much. Seems you could just pick another car brand and insert it into this spot. Also don’t see how this ties to Hyundai’s stated strategy to reinforce its new brand direction of “Modern Premium.”

Who uses the word “brilliant” anyway, unless you’re talking about your kids?

Believe it or not, Hyundai says it spent a year doing leg work preparing for this, including consumer research. Then it shot the commercials over 10 days in Los Angeles earlier this year.

And the Mother Ship spent some dough on this, hiring award winning German director Juergen Bollmeyer and buying “Departures,” the song from “Like Crazy,” which won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Drama last year at  Sundance.

What Hyundai’s Mother Ship DIDN’T do was consult in other regions with its marketing chiefs or officials from Innocean, the ad agency owned by Hyundai’s controlling family. Instead, the Mother Ship simply forced this work down their throats, regional strategies be damned.

Mind you, Hyundai in North America just launched its new ad slogan “New Thinking. New Possibilities” about 14 months ago. It takes a lot of time for the public to grasp new ad themes. Sometimes people never catch on to ad tags, especially if they are inane, which too many of them are.

We’re not a fan of the Mother Ship dictating ads to other parts of the world.

Here’s some examples. From Japan, Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. decided in 2011 it was time for its Subaru of America arm to use the new ad theme “Confidence in Motion,” which has zero emotional appeal. From Germany, Volkswagen insisted in 2009 that VW of America use “Das Auto” to convey German engineering. DUH!

Hyundai’s “Brilliant” idea?

I think not.

MAKING TRACKS: Michael Jackson is returning to Motown and he’s bringing his year-old ad agency with him.

His year-old shop, Jackson & Partners, is relocating from Las Vegas to Midtown Detroit and expects to create 30 news jobs in the next three years. Jackson’s partners are Detroit-area native and auto creative chief Gary Topolewski, along with Randy Easterbrook, an indie communications consultant who has done work for many big companies, including General Motors and Mini.

 Jackson joined GM in 2000 as executive director of sales and marketing support, but he rose to VP-marketing and advertising for North America in 2006, overseeing a $2-billion-plus ad budget.  He left GM and Detroit in 2007.  Since then he was CEO of SPEEDSHAPE, worked at digital shop Sarkissian Mason and more recently VP of global sales and distribution for Coda in California.

 J&P’s current client roster includes auto dealers on both coasts, plus brand-building work for a nationally-known jewelry group.

Mr. Easterbrook is in the process of moving from New York.

Topolewski’s experience includes Jeep at Bozell, where he and his team won a Gold Lion at Cannes; Cadillac at Leo Burnett; and Nissan, Taco Bell and Apple at TBWA/Chiat/Day.

Good luck, guys!

MAKING TRACKS TOO: Bob Rickert has joined the Denver-area office of HMH as executive creative director, handling accounts that include Nike, Freightliner, Detroit Diesel and Dr. Martens. Rickert had stints at David&Goliath on Kia and Saatchi & Saatchi on Toyota.

You can find me, Jean Halliday, on Facebook and LinkedIn and also on Twitter @ jhal2001


Nissan’s Unbelievable Frontier Ads

By Jean Halliday
Nissan North America has unleashed a couple of over-the-top TV commercials for its Frontier pickup. One of them in particular is generating lots of online buzz.
Called “Landing Gear,” the spot shows the mid-size Frontier rescuing a commercial airline with landing gear trouble.

There’s plenty of non-believers out there about the reality of Frontier’s ability to pull off this amazing feat, according to the comments on YouTube, where the commercial has already tallied a very respectable number of views- more than 305,000 in just a few weeks.
After all, the maximum towing capacity of the 2012 Frontier is rated at up to 6,500 pounds maximum, when properly equipped. Let’s estimate, conservatively, that the weight for the nose for that moving plane weighs about 30,000 pounds.
Anyone see a problem here?
It’s hard to remember the last time Nissan even advertised its mid-size pickup and it’s a mystery why it would take this route.
Then there’s the other commercial, dubbed “ Hill Climb,” showing the Frontier doing another incredible task.

Plenty of non-believers commented on YouTube about this one too. “The commercials are actually 100 percent fake, which tells you everything you need to know about the company which paid for them. You really want to buy a truck from people who have zero respect for the viewing audience?”
And finally, Nissan more recently posted this online-only video spoofing the landing gear mishap as a real news story. You can see that one here:

Nissan, and its legal beagles, have however, covered their butts on all three of these. If you look very closely- and quickly- all three videos have the small words “ Fictionalization. Do not attempt.”
So there.
The commercial is, to put it politely, a dramatization. But the words are only there for the opening 4-to-6 seconds before they disappear. Clearly the YouTube viewers debating the videos’ veracity have not spotted the disclaimer.
Why would an automaker want to show one of their products doing something it can’t really do? It insults consumers and in the end belittles the product.
Nissan could also run the risk of rival complaints for deceptive advertising to either the Federal Trade Commission or National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business.
Brings back memories of Volvo’s 1990 “Monster Truck” commercial scandal. The Volvo was the only car not crushed by a “monster truck” in that spot, but Volvo didn’t reveal in the ad that the roof of its vehicle had been reinforced. The FTC levied fines of of $150,000 against both Volvo and its then-ad agency, Scali, McCabe, Sloves in Manhattan, which got fired over the incident.
As if the buzzing online doubts about the Frontier’s abilities isn’t enough, another online grapevine is building that Nissan and its ad agency, TBWA, stole the “Landing Gear” idea from Jeep.
Ex-Chrysler marketing executive Jeff Bell was the first to sound the alarm about this, posting on Facebook: “Just shows you that 1) the people running auto marketing have either no historical awareness or 2) they have no pride and enjoy plagiarism.”
Ouch!
Decide for yourself. Here’s the cheeky viral ad Bell says Chrysler had made for Jeep of Europe:

FYI- This 405 project (www.405:themovie.com) was produced by Bruce Branit and Jeremy Hunt for Jeep in 2000, one of very early viral videos that Yahoo Internet Life magazine called the web movie of that year.
Okay, even though the two commercials are very similar, we’re not saying TBWA took Jeep’s idea. There are coincidences. But with search portals, YouTube’s vast body of material and other sites, it’s pretty easy to check whether that Big Idea for your commercial is truly fresh.
So, I did some surfing of my own and found this very similar image in the first 10 seconds of a montage of 1970s and 1980s commercials for the Chevrolet Silverado by Campbell-Ewald in Warren, Michigan:

Hmm, so was it Jeep that first ripped off GM’s similar idea back in 2000?
Big Ideas for advertising could be like the myth of the Christmas Fruit Cakes: there’s only seven of them in the world and they keep getting passed on.
If you’re going to do a dramatic pickup ad, you might as well go over the top, but in an entertaining way that the audience knows is fake.
One of my favorites was for Ford’s 1997 model F-150. By JWT Detroit, it broke during the 1996 Super Bowl and featured actor Jack Palance as a tough cowboy who uses the pickup and a lariat to rope a butte and close a river gorge.

Now that’s a Big Idea.

MAKING TRACKS: Eric Grenier moved to VP – Director, Enterprise at Ford’s ad agency- Team Detroit in Dearborn – from Organic.

***THIS POST first appeared in CNW Research’s most recent subscriber-only  Retail Automotive Summary.

You can follow me on Facebook and LinkedIn. Also on Twitter as @jhal2001

Ram Ropes Cowboy Theme: “Guts. Glory.”

Chrysler Group’s Ram truck brand (formerly part of Dodge) is using cowboys and the Old West for its new multi-media ad campaign. The work, from Richards Group in Dallas, introduces the new tag “Guts. Glory. Ram.” It replaces “I am Ram.”
The first :60 national intro commercial, dubbed “Code of the West,” sets the stage for the blitz

Too bad the pickup doesn’t show up until more than half-way into the commercial.
Cowbows aren’t a new Big Idea for truck advertising. It’s almost a bad cliché.
Chevrolet was big on it. Here’s one from Campbell-Ewald for the 1997 model Silverado


Even GM sibling Pontiac used cowboys – for the Montana minivan – in the late ’90s to try to be more appealing to men. D’Arcy, Masius, Benton & Bowles’ Detroit-area handled and used Robert Mitchum to narrate:

In probably the most bizarre use of cowboys to peddle a light truck, Mitsubishi had this spot for the 1998 Montero suv from G2, Santa Monica, which soon after, not surprisingly, lost the account


Who doesn’t love cowboys and the romance of the Old West? It’s rugged and oh, so American. And what’s not to like about actor Sam Elliott’s rich voice narrating the Ram commercials?

Olivier Francois, Chrysler Group’s French-born CMO, has a penchant for edgy work that generates buzz, a la Chrysler brand’s 200 Super Bowl “Imported From Detroit” commercial with Eminem. The official word from Francois on the new pickup work is : “the Ram Truck brand has always had the guts to perform and innovate – today, it continues to live by those rules and conducts. The brand’s outstanding craftsmanship and beliefs are delivered in this campaign by using the rustic Old West as the perfect juxtaposition of past and present American values; a time when hard working and well-crafted man-made machines were a must.”
That American craftsmanship idea, and the tone of the Ram ads, also run deep in the automaker’s Jeep advertising “The Things We Make, Make Us,” introduced a year ago for launch of the new Grand Cherokee by Wieden + Kennedy in Portland.
Ram does take the cowboy thing to a new level. This work is generally visually arresting and interesting. That said, the big question is can this cowboy theme be sustained for Ram? Will it last as long as “Like a Rock” for Chevrolet?
I think not.

MAKING TRACKS: Tim Ellis

has gone to California and joined Activision as exec VP and CMO from Volkswagen, where he had been VP of marketing since December 2007. We wondered here earlier this spring about his future at VW after Tim Mahoney split from Subaru of America to be VW’s CMO and chief product officer. Ellis was to report to Mahoney.

Follow  me on Twitter: @jhal2001