Tag Archives: auto advertising

Are Chevy Ads Finding New Roads?

Chevrolet recently introduced its new “Find New Roads” advertising tag with a splashy :90 TV commercial that broke during the Grammy Awards. The montage of cars, each with different music, is visually interesting. In case you missed it, here’s the spot from Chevy’s ad agency Commonwealth, a 50-50 joint venture of IPG’s McCann Erickson Worldwide and Omnicom’s Goodby, Silverstein & Partners

It’s good to see that General Motors’ biggest brand included the sexy Corvette in the commercial. But why are there no crossovers or pickups? Those segments are certainly a big part of the brand’s bread and butter these days. The scenes in the spot are pretty nifty. The robo dog is cool and who doesn’t like deer? The  first part of the Sonic section looks very much like a spot for retailer Target, another Grammy broadcast sponsor.

But the whole thing somehow doesn’t gel as one; doesn’t come together. Who is finding new roads? Where are the new roads?

What probably bothers me most is the boastful line “with the best lineup of vehicles ever….”

Memo to Chevy: Who said you have the best lineup ever? It’s better to use third-party ratings than pound on your chest with that blanket statement. Why? Because there’s plenty of skeptics out there and people are more likely to trust third party sources. Hopefully Chevy will have some testimonial ads touting its “best lineup” ever.

And say goodbye to Tim Allen as the voice of Chevy advertising. He was thrown out with the “Chevy Runs Deep” ad tag that lived for a little over two years, created by Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco. That’s OK, you can still hear the actor narrating ads for Campbell’s Soup. You’re now hearing John Cusack doing Chevrolet ad voice overs.

The second spot out there with the “Find New Roads” ad tag is for the 2013 Chevy Traverse.

Check out how the ad shows seating for 8, whether they are real or imaginary

Sorry, Chevy and Commonwealth, but this ad is awful close to Kia’s 2010 Super Bowl commercial for the Sorento, showing the critters from kids’  popular cable TV show Yo Gabba Gabba come to life

It certainly looks like Chevrolet and Commonwealth stole the idea from Kia and their ad agency DavidandGoliath. These sort of coincidences happen from time to time in this business. There was one season in the ’90s when 2 or 3 different car brands featured grocery store parking lots and shopping carts in their commercials.

The longer you’ve been in this business, the more examples of these coincidences you see. Here’s another one, this time it’s Kia, which in recent weeks broke a national spot for the 2014 Sorento. Check out how Kia touted the crossover’s power-folding mirrors and programmable power lift gate in a tight parking space

Of course lots of people would never jam their $23,000-to$33,000 new vehicle into such a tight spot. This Big Idea isn’t so fresh. Check out this commercial from WPP’s JWT (now TeamDetroit) for the 2000-model Ford Focus

And so it goes. If you’ve got any to add, please leave a comment and thanks for taking the time to read AutoAdOpolis.

MAKING TRACKS: General Motors has shifted Craig Bierley from ad director for Buick GMC to the same post at Cadillac. Craig, a Michigan native, has been with GM for 22-plus years, starting there as a financial analyst. He succeeds Molly Peck, who was moved last fall from the Caddy post to USA ad director of Chevrolet. The merry-go-round continues over there.

Follow me, Jean Halliday, on LinkedIn, Facebook and Forbes.com

and on Twitter @jhal2001

Honda’s US Ad Agency Pitch: Rigged??

American Honda Motor Co. has called a review for both its Honda and Acura brands in the USA, encompassing creative, media buying and planning.

The surprise isn’t that a review has been called. It’s that it has taken this long to happen.

Other than a few bright advertising stars in recent years, including the boffo Super Bowl commercials for both Honda and Acura in 2012, the work hasn’t exactly set the world on fire.

I don’t place all the blame on the incumbents: Honda’s longtime agency of record, RPA in Santa Monica, and rp&, its sister arm on Acura. The clients, after all, kept approving their work year in and year out. An example of the industry adage : a client getting the work it deserves. The incumbent agencies will defend their biggest accounts.

But it doesn’t look good for the home teams. There’s already some skeptics – not at the incumbents- grumbling that the review is a set-up. The skeptics posit that   giant Japanese ad agency Dentsu, which  handles Honda in its home market there, will manage to steer the account to its McGarryBowen agency network.

It’s never wise to discount the pull an agency has with the client at the mother ship. The marketing brass at the corporate offices of many a global car company are close to the execs at their shops in the mother land and they also, from time to time, like to flex their brass muscles to make sweeping worldwide moves.

Dentsu’s Tokyo office won a Cyber Lion in Cannes in June for the work it did for Honda in Japan. Think THAT doesn’t impress the mother ship?

This summer, Dentsu’s McGarryBowen office in London managed to win the pitch for Honda’s  pan-European launch of the CR-V, besting 5 other shops, including Wieden & Kennedy in the UK. The huge win was the agency’s first since parent Dentsu changed the name of its European offices from Dentsu to McGarryBowen earlier this year. Dentsu acquired the 6-year-old McGarryBown agency in 2008.

What other agencies have won at Cannes for Honda?

Well Wieden, natch, whose most memorable  Honda work in Europe has to be this UK spot called  “Cog,” which won a Gold Lion in Cannes in 2003

RPA’s last Cannes win for Honda? Anyone?

Other than this year’s Super Bowl commercials, one of my favorite Honda spots in recent years from RPA was for the Element in 2006, featuring that delightful crab named Gil, who later ended up with a big life all his own in social media

This work was perfect for the Element’s young target audience and cut through the clutter.

It’s never a good time for an agency review and is going to cause lots of stress for the folks at RPA and rp&, especially during the holidays. Best of luck!

MAKING TRACKS: Joel Ewanick lands at Fisker Automotive as the acting head of global marketing and sales, while the car company looks for a full-time replacement. Not surprised to see him land so quickly. He was pushed out of General Motors in the summer after a little over 2 years at the automaker as global CMO. Ewanick succeeds Richard Beattie, who retired from Fisker after a long career in the car business with stints at Jaguar, Mazda and Ford.

Find me, Jean Halliday, on LinkedIn, Facebook and Forbes.com

On Twitter: @jhal2001

AUTOMAKERS UNVEIL SUPER BOWL ADS

 

The countdown clock is ticking until the kick-off of Super Bowl XLVI and more auto advertisers are revealing their Game Day commercials. Noticeably absent in the pre-game hype- AGAIN this year- is Chrysler Group. Last year, Chrysler was mum until its 2-minute “Imported From Detroit” spot for the Chrysler 200 aired during the game. Sometimes surprises are good. This year, Chrysler will have a :90 commercial that we’ll all just have to wait to see.

American Honda Motor unleashed a long version of its Super Bowl commercial, starring actor Matthew Broderick in a modern-day version of his movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.”

This 2:25 video shows Broderick calling in sick and escaping in his all-new, fourth-generation 2012 Honda CR-V to have some fun.

This is a fun spot that’s bound to break through the clutter during the Big Game this Sunday. Honda’s longtime agency, RPA in Santa Monica, tapped big-time director Todd Phillips (The Hangover, Old School) for this work.

The commercial is one of the best RPA has done for Honda in a long time and is far and away superior to the first launch work for the new CR-V that broke at the start of the year, including this one from RPA, called “Proposal”

Honda’s CR-V Super Bowl commercial is also tied into the Leaplist. Honda.com site, where there’s a CR-V Leap Year Contest to win a new CR-V and other prizes. Honda has smartly tied in with social media, encouraging its Facebook fans to find and comment on the dozens of “Easter eggs” in the spot reminiscent of the original Bueller flick. That link is http://www.facebook.com/hondacrv

And here comes the Toyota brand, which is advertising in the Super Bowl for the first time in three years.

Toyota is pushing the seventh-generation 2012 Camry with this entertaining commercial called “Reinvented” from Saatchi & Saatchi Los Angeles

Although this version is a minute long, this spot will be sliced to a :30 commercial for the Super Bowl and one of two :30s the brand will have in the game. Toyota says this commercial is scheduled to air in the third quarter and will be backed by a social media play kicking off after the spot airs. Viewers will be encouraged to go to Twitter and tweet with the #Reinvented hashtag about what they’d like to see reinvented. Toyota will respond to select tweets in real time with a creative depiction of that idea.
Toyota doesn’t have a history of exciting advertising, so this one is a breath of fresh air.

Not so for Kia, which has only released a sexy teaser for its Super Bowl commercial, starring Victoria Secret model Adriana Lima for the new Optima

We’ll see if the old adage “Sex Sells” works for Kia in this case. Don’t bet on it. We much prefer Kia’s “Epic” entry in last year’s Super Bowl for the Optima, also from DavidandGoliath in Los Angeles.

Kia’s affiliate, Hyundai is back for its fifth straight year as a Big Game advertiser. Hyundai said it will have five spots on game day: two during the pre-game, one in pre-kick slot and two in the game. Innocean Worldwide Americas in Huntington Beach, California, is the brand’s creative agency of record.

Hyundai is using the very-recognizable and uplifting theme from the movie “Rocky” for this minute-long spot, called “All For One,” about team work at its Montgomery, Alabama plant

Then there’s this one, called “Think Fast,” for the 2013 Genesis Coupe, which comes with a 348-horsepower, V-6 engine

How about this one for the 201-horsepower Veloster Turbo?

Sorry, but a guy getting mauled by a cheetah isn’t that funny.

Hyundai is also patting itself on the back for its big win for the 2012 Elantra as Car of the Year at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit earlier this month with this commercial, called “Victory Lap”

Look for that one to air sometime before the game starts.

Lastly is Cadillac, which is pre-launching its new ATS with this snoozer called “Green Hell” from Fallon

There are certainly a lot of car ads made at Germany’s Nürburgring, so this commercial won’t break through the clutter. If you’re going to advertiser in the Super Bowl- Go Big or don’t bother!

Late Edition Addition: Honda’s Acura brand is pulling out all the stops for its first appearance as a Super Bowl advertiser. The brand has a minute-long spot featuring Jerry Seinfeld, who tries his hardest to move from number 20 to first on the list to get the new, upcoming 2012 NSX. There’s appearances by the Soup Nazi, Jay Leno, an, an alien and dancing holographic monkeys. You can see the longer 1:52 version here

Acura says it wants to strengthen its brand awareness. No doubt. The brand sold 123,299 new vehicles in the USA last year, an 8% drop from 2010.

The spot, called “Transactions,” was created by Acura’s agency rp&, a sibling of Honda’s longtime shop RP&A in Santa Monica.

OUCH! And Chevrolet has taken direct aim at Volkswagen’s already-released Big Game commercial teaser, with dogs barking out Star Wars’ theme song.

General Motors’ volume brand has uploaded a dog video of its own, from the popular OK Go group. Chevy teamed with the band for a new MTV video arriving this weekend featuring the Sonic. Chevy doesn’t call out VW by name, but in describing the video on YouTube says “we’ve all seen videos with talented dogs. Chevrolet’s favorite came from OK Go last year.”

Let the game begin!

(See my earlier posts for Chevrolet, Volkswagen, Lexus and Suzuki’s Bowl entries)

MAKING TRACKS: Anthony Kuhn joined Everist Genomics Inc as Director of Strategic Alliances. Tony has lots of ad agency experience, having worked at TBWA, Lowe and Bozell.

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Nissan’s Unbelievable Frontier Ads

By Jean Halliday
Nissan North America has unleashed a couple of over-the-top TV commercials for its Frontier pickup. One of them in particular is generating lots of online buzz.
Called “Landing Gear,” the spot shows the mid-size Frontier rescuing a commercial airline with landing gear trouble.

There’s plenty of non-believers out there about the reality of Frontier’s ability to pull off this amazing feat, according to the comments on YouTube, where the commercial has already tallied a very respectable number of views- more than 305,000 in just a few weeks.
After all, the maximum towing capacity of the 2012 Frontier is rated at up to 6,500 pounds maximum, when properly equipped. Let’s estimate, conservatively, that the weight for the nose for that moving plane weighs about 30,000 pounds.
Anyone see a problem here?
It’s hard to remember the last time Nissan even advertised its mid-size pickup and it’s a mystery why it would take this route.
Then there’s the other commercial, dubbed “ Hill Climb,” showing the Frontier doing another incredible task.

Plenty of non-believers commented on YouTube about this one too. “The commercials are actually 100 percent fake, which tells you everything you need to know about the company which paid for them. You really want to buy a truck from people who have zero respect for the viewing audience?”
And finally, Nissan more recently posted this online-only video spoofing the landing gear mishap as a real news story. You can see that one here:

Nissan, and its legal beagles, have however, covered their butts on all three of these. If you look very closely- and quickly- all three videos have the small words “ Fictionalization. Do not attempt.”
So there.
The commercial is, to put it politely, a dramatization. But the words are only there for the opening 4-to-6 seconds before they disappear. Clearly the YouTube viewers debating the videos’ veracity have not spotted the disclaimer.
Why would an automaker want to show one of their products doing something it can’t really do? It insults consumers and in the end belittles the product.
Nissan could also run the risk of rival complaints for deceptive advertising to either the Federal Trade Commission or National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business.
Brings back memories of Volvo’s 1990 “Monster Truck” commercial scandal. The Volvo was the only car not crushed by a “monster truck” in that spot, but Volvo didn’t reveal in the ad that the roof of its vehicle had been reinforced. The FTC levied fines of of $150,000 against both Volvo and its then-ad agency, Scali, McCabe, Sloves in Manhattan, which got fired over the incident.
As if the buzzing online doubts about the Frontier’s abilities isn’t enough, another online grapevine is building that Nissan and its ad agency, TBWA, stole the “Landing Gear” idea from Jeep.
Ex-Chrysler marketing executive Jeff Bell was the first to sound the alarm about this, posting on Facebook: “Just shows you that 1) the people running auto marketing have either no historical awareness or 2) they have no pride and enjoy plagiarism.”
Ouch!
Decide for yourself. Here’s the cheeky viral ad Bell says Chrysler had made for Jeep of Europe:

FYI- This 405 project (www.405:themovie.com) was produced by Bruce Branit and Jeremy Hunt for Jeep in 2000, one of very early viral videos that Yahoo Internet Life magazine called the web movie of that year.
Okay, even though the two commercials are very similar, we’re not saying TBWA took Jeep’s idea. There are coincidences. But with search portals, YouTube’s vast body of material and other sites, it’s pretty easy to check whether that Big Idea for your commercial is truly fresh.
So, I did some surfing of my own and found this very similar image in the first 10 seconds of a montage of 1970s and 1980s commercials for the Chevrolet Silverado by Campbell-Ewald in Warren, Michigan:

Hmm, so was it Jeep that first ripped off GM’s similar idea back in 2000?
Big Ideas for advertising could be like the myth of the Christmas Fruit Cakes: there’s only seven of them in the world and they keep getting passed on.
If you’re going to do a dramatic pickup ad, you might as well go over the top, but in an entertaining way that the audience knows is fake.
One of my favorites was for Ford’s 1997 model F-150. By JWT Detroit, it broke during the 1996 Super Bowl and featured actor Jack Palance as a tough cowboy who uses the pickup and a lariat to rope a butte and close a river gorge.

Now that’s a Big Idea.

MAKING TRACKS: Eric Grenier moved to VP – Director, Enterprise at Ford’s ad agency- Team Detroit in Dearborn – from Organic.

***THIS POST first appeared in CNW Research’s most recent subscriber-only  Retail Automotive Summary.

You can follow me on Facebook and LinkedIn. Also on Twitter as @jhal2001

MINI Drives into Television

Since arriving back in the USA nine years ago, MINI hasn’t spent a lot on television advertising. And compared to larger automakers, MINI hasn’t spent much at all in measured media- well under $40 million annually- the amount the big guys can easily spend just launching a single new model.
But this year the BMW-owned brand is shaking up its media plans and pushing into television.
Tom Salkowsky, MINI’s marketing manager since December, told me the brand will keep its “heavy pace” of TV advertising that started this year with its first Super Bowl appearance and continue through the rest of the year.
How heavy, you might wonder?
Salkowsky says MINI had more than 4,000 TV spots in the first quarter alone.
Salkowsky, who has been with BMW since 1997, says moving into TV now lets MINI communicate to a larger audience and gets the word out about the bigger Countryman model.
The best of the bunch by far is this one, called “Flow,” as part of the launch of the new Countryman

This commercial is pure MINI. Filmed in Milan, Italy it captures the European flavor of the car, its sense of adventure and fun-to-drive nature. It grabs your attention. Bravo to BSUR in Amsterdam, MINI’s global agency, to the agency’s Creative Director Jason Schragger and the clients for recognizing exceptional work. This commercial also ran in lots of other markets worldwide. You can check out a “behind the scenes” look at how CG was used to make “Flow” here

BSUR also created :15s for the Countryman launch in this country that were getting heavy play on TV here in the first quarter. Here’s one called “Flight Attendant”

Not as impactful as “Flow,” but gets the point across that the Countryman is bigger than the original MINI model, has four doors and all-wheel drive.
Makes you wonder where this leaves MINI’s US creative shop, Butler, Shine, Stern & Partners in Sausalito, California.
Salkowsky says Butler, Shine is still plenty busy doing all MINI’s collateral, events, point of purchase stuff and media planning. (IPG’s Universal McCann buys MINI USA’s national and spot TV and radio).
Okay. But there’s no arguing that BSUR’s work is heads and shoulders above MINI’s 2011 Super Bowl commercial for the Countryman, dubbed “Cram it in the Boot”

Butler, Shine totally missed the mark with this spot. We get the “boot” joke, but bet there’s lots of Americans who don’t know this is the Brits’ word for car trunk. The spot is an embarrassment for the brand and a total waste of ad dollars. It was crass and not relevant to the brand – just bad advertising.
Then again- the client approved it.
MINI isn’t abandoning other mediums. It had a massive, nine-panel outdoor in Times Square for the Countryman that faced three city streets

MINI at 42nd St & 7th Ave

That just came down recently, after getting 40-million-plus impressions for each of the two months it was up.
MINI, known for events, is also considering driving events pitting the Countryman against key rivals, including the VW Tiguan, Kia Soul and Suzuki SX4.
Something MINI USA is doing seems to be working because the brand reported that its new car sales jumped by 41% in the first quarter to 12,241 units.

NEW ROADS: Congrats to Molly Peck, the new ad director at Cadillac, succeeding Kim Brink. Peck had been Chevrolet’s national ad manager since February 2007.

FIND ME ON TWITTER @jhal2001

Super Bowl Auto Ad Pileup

The Super Bowl of advertising is almost here.
And there’s a slew of carmakers advertising in the big game’s broadcast Feb. 6 on Fox.
Far and away the best of the bunch is Kia, which is launching the newest Optima with this over-the-top :60 from DavidandGoliath in El Segundo, California

Epic, indeed. This commercial is so arresting and unusual for the auto category. We predict Kia will get a ton of buzz and online traffic from this.
Glad to see Mercedes-Benz again using Janis Joplin’s famous song in its minute-long Super Bowl commercial in the fourth quarter. This is a very hard working commercial from Merkley & Partners, New York, since it covers heritage, safety, the 125th anniversary PLUS the global unveiling of four new models. Sean Combs provides comic relief.

VW has two commercials in the game- one for the new Passat; the other for the upcoming Beetle.
The Passat spot is cute

Sorry, but this one for the Beetle gives me the creeps.

VW called this commercial a bold move (wasn’t that Ford’s slogan a few years back?) since only the profile of the upcoming Beetle is shown. But let’s face it, the ultimate car commercial that DIDN’T SHOW the vehicle was Jeep’s “Snow Covered” from 1994 via Bozell Detroit

Chevrolet has five commercials. None of them are bombs, but this one for the Cruze has the potential to upset some folks, including the AARP

Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco handles Chevy. This one, for the Camaro, has a surprising twist

“Never mess with a Chevy, dude” is an understatement.

Then there’s this quirky one for the Silverado, which falls flat

Hyundai, which is launching the new Elantra, has this visually-cool spot called “Deprogramming” in the third quarter. And who doesn’t love the Dude narrating?

Hyundai’s ad agency, Innocean Worldwide Americas in Huntington Beach, California, also created this one for the 2011 Elantra called “Hypnotize.”

It sort of reminds me of one that Arnold did for the VW Jetta years ago called “Synchronicity.”

Audi of America put out a couple of teaser videos on YouTube to set the stage for its minute-long commercial in the first quarter. Sax player Kenny G will play his horn to help supress a riot in Luxury Prison.

Audi also posted this tongue-in-cheek “Startled Smart” video as a teaser. Audi follows its on-going theme of being the emblem of new luxury, while poking fun at old luxury

Suzuki made a spot buy to advertise in 14 markets during the Super Bowl- it’s first appearance. The automaker is recycling this fun commercial called “Wicked Weather” from Siltanen & Partners Advertising, El Segundo, California, for the 2011 Kizashi sport sedan.

We’ll have to wait for game day to see BMW’s and Chrysler Group’s. Oh- they decided to keep their commercials a big secret. It’s advertising, guys! Not espionage.

MAKING TRACKS: Kim (Kosak) Brink is out at GM, where she started right out of college in 1989 as a market research analyst at Chevy. Her last day as executive director of Cadillac advertising was Jan. 28th. Apparently she didn’t fit in with the new marketing regime. Hey, Kim, you had a great run and were part of the heady days of the Cadillac mafia earlier this decade.

HYUNDAI’S FIRST TURBO AD WILL MAKE YOU SMILE

Thumbs up to Hyundai for its delightful new TV commercial for the 2011 Sonata Turbo, dubbed “Turbo Face.”
The spot shows a bearded guy behind the wheel of Hyundai’s first, four-cylinder turbo making wild faces expressing his euphoria over the experience.

Innocean Worldwide Americas in Huntington Beach, California, Hyundai’s in-house shop, also created a Facebook page for the car that is promoted at the end of the television commercial to get more bang for their buck.

Here’s the link

facebook.com/sonataturboface

Visitors to the Facebook page can see just how the heck the ad agency got all the driver’s hair to stand on end and it was quite an elaborate set-up.

There’s bound to be some critics around who will blast Hyundai and Innocean for faking the driving experience in the videos. But they should be ignored. Hyundai and Innocean have come up with an entertaining commercial showing how fun the 274-horsepower car is to drive.

And you can’t argue with results. Hyundai’s US sales are up 20% in the first three quarters of 2010, better the industry average of 10%, according to Automotive News.

Bravo!

Mitsu’s Baack

We’re about to see what Mitsubishi Motors North America’s new ad agency, 180 LA in Santa Monica, has been up to since winning the account in June after a formal pitch.

Starting Oct. 15, people (disclaimer: 18 years and older with a driver’s license) can sign up for what the automaker is calling the world’s first Online Test Drive – for the new 2011 Outlander Sport. It all happens at the crossover’s microsite here: http://www.outlandersport.com

The live, virtual test drives don’t start ’til Nov. 1, so be patient. Mitsubushi says the test drive will give you the feeling of being in the driver’s seat, with the motorist having “almost total control” over the vehicle.

The test drive is part of a bigger ad launch for the new model that will include TV, print, digital and direct mail. The test drive and ads run through January. We’ll reserve judgment until we see them.

Meantime, this virtual test drive via interactive remote controls sounds cool. But the success of it all depends on how well the technology works and how well Mitsubishi promotes it. The camaker doesn’t have a tradition of mongo ad budgets, which is most likely the main reason the incumbent ad agency, indie Traffic in Hollywood, stepped away from the account after only about 18 months. Let’s just figure Mitsubishi is spending well under $100 million annually on advertising. That’s an amount some car companies spend advertising a single model in a year.

We liked Traffic’s work -what little there was of it, especially the coupe of snagging James Sloyan, the familar, longtime voice of Lexus ads, to narrate Mitsu’s commercials.

But the Sloyan era at Mitsu ended pretty quickly. A shame. Why? Because the Japanese brass at Mitsu didn’t want to shake the tree too hard for their fellow countrymen at bigger, richer Lexus.

Mitsu has been slogging along for a while now, selling just under 54,000 new vehicles in the U.S. last year and sold a mere 41,392 in the first 9 months of this year. To be fair, that’s only 3% less than the first three quarters of 2009. And yeah, last year was an utter disaster for most of the industry and this year has been no picnic.

Mitsu makes cool-looking cars that are generally fun to drive and seem to be a decent value. The brand’s biggest problems are: A) Nobody knows B) Weak image C) Slow recovery from a near-death experience earlier this decade. That financial

tsunami bit into new product development, along with the company’s reputation after a scandal at its parent in Japan, where executives were arrested for hiding dangerous vehicle defects. In 2004, Mitsu’s Japanese parent lost its longtime development partner and stakeholder, Daimler. And faahh-get-about the executive turnover in the U.S.

Ah, but let’s get back to the virtual test drives, which I can’t wait to try. Sign up next Friday for the virtual test drive, please send me your feedback and we’ll compare notes.

We’ll get back to you on the new ads after they break.